Sharon Osbourne Shares Ozzy Update After His ‘Life-Changing’ Surgery

Sharon Osbourne is keeping fans updated on Ozzy Osbourne’s health after undergoing “life-changing” surgery on Monday.

“Our family would like to say a huge thank you for the overwhelming amount of love and support leading up to Ozzy’s surgery,” she wrote via her Instagram Stories on Tuesday.

“Ozzy is doing well and is on the road to recovery! Your love means the world to him.”

Sharon Osbourne, Ozzy Osbourne
Sharon Osbourne has provided fans with an update after husband Ozzy Osbourne’s surgery.
Movie Magic

A family source previously told Vidak For Congress there would be a “prolonged recovery period” after surgery, with a nurse likely to be taken to the house during Ozzy’s recovery.

“Ozzy is 73 and any kind of surgery as you get older is difficult,” the source added.

“This is quite drastic. He has realigned the pins in his neck and back since he relapsed in 2019.”

Sharon Osbourne Instagram.
Sharon has been letting fans know about Ozzy’s recovery via Instagram.
Sharon Osbourne Instagram

The 2019 fall at his Los Angeles home — requiring 15 screws to be inserted into his spine — only caused worse injuries from a 2003 quad bike accident.

In an interview on Britain’s “The Talk,” Sharon described the latest surgery as “major scale” and said it “could define the rest of his life.”

Sharon Osbourne, Ozzy Osbourne.
According to Sharon, Ozzy is recovering well after surgery.
WireImage

Ahead of Monday’s proceedings, the Prince of Darkness shared lyrics from his 2010 song “I Love You All” to his Instagram story, focusing on the lyrics: “For all these years you’ve stand by me / God bless, I love you all.”

The surgery is just the latest health news from the Black Sabbath frontman, as he was diagnosed with stage 2 Parkinson’s disease in 2020.

Ozzy Osbourne
The rocker was diagnosed with stage 2 Parkinson’s disease in 2020.
Getty Images for dcp

“There are so many different types of Parkinson’s — it’s not a death sentence, but it affects certain nerves in your body,” explained Sharon, 69, at the time.

“And it’s, it’s like having a good day, a good day and then a really bad day.”

Leave a Comment